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Oct 19, 2014 / 762 notes

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Oct 19, 2014 / 2,947 notes
Oct 18, 2014 / 3,933 notes

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Oct 18, 2014 / 2,335 notes

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officialcrow:

this the realest post on this whole shit
Oct 18, 2014 / 98,057 notes

officialcrow:

this the realest post on this whole shit

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Oct 13, 2014 / 901 notes

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guernicamag:

guernicamag:

In the vast cultural, economic, and political space of America, there is, on the one hand, the government, and on the other there is what governs us. There’s a lot of room between the strictures of law and the practicalities of daily life—a space occupied by family, bureaucrats, preachers, landlords, and doctors, by love, by money, or that thing you feel in the absence of money, by corporations, even by art. We can’t speak of empires today in the way that Edward Gibbon might. Even the new Star Wars is post-imperial. There is no monolith, no American Empire that provides all the rules, sets all the standards—what we have instead is only America, messy pastiche. So what could we rightly call a modern empire? A business, or a church, if it’s considerably big, or a natural resource, with its attendant corporate and environmental concerns? They can be powerful enough, and more than willing enough to wield that power. But this raises another question: Should we even give them that moniker? To crown a Wall Street tycoon or Silicon Valley technocrat an emperor might imbue them with power they don’t otherwise have. An exercise in rhetoric, maybe—but then again, how we define something influences how we see it, and, in turn, how we behave toward it.
In this special issue of Guernica, the third of four made possible through your generous support of our Kickstarter campaign, we offer a few panels from this sprawling imperial mosaic—its victims and beneficiaries, the merciful and the mercenary. You won’t find these empires on a map, tucked as they are behind the names of can’t-say-I’ve-been-there towns. Be on the lookout instead for an office complex, someplace awash in the soothing hum of data centers and microwave transmitters. Their borders are the perimeter of the boardroom table, the cut of a sharp suit. If, that is, you decide they exist at all.
In this issue: features from Richard Price, Laura Gottesdiener, Christopher Leonard, Jessica Machado, Ed Winstead, and the Guernica staff; interviews with Shannon Brownlee and Dr. Vikas Saini, Ben Wizner, and Anthony Pinn; an interview with artist Ben Davis; new fiction from Karen E. Bender and Constance Squires; and poetry from Danniel Schoonebeek and Rachel Richardson. We hope you enjoy the read.
American Empires: Power and Its Discontents - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics

Did you miss our latest special issue? Brighten up this gray Monday with a few choice reads on American Empire.
Oct 13, 2014 / 37 notes

guernicamag:

guernicamag:

In the vast cultural, economic, and political space of America, there is, on the one hand, the government, and on the other there is what governs us. There’s a lot of room between the strictures of law and the practicalities of daily life—a space occupied by family, bureaucrats, preachers, landlords, and doctors, by love, by money, or that thing you feel in the absence of money, by corporations, even by art. We can’t speak of empires today in the way that Edward Gibbon might. Even the new Star Wars is post-imperial. There is no monolith, no American Empire that provides all the rules, sets all the standards—what we have instead is only America, messy pastiche. So what could we rightly call a modern empire? A business, or a church, if it’s considerably big, or a natural resource, with its attendant corporate and environmental concerns? They can be powerful enough, and more than willing enough to wield that power. But this raises another question: Should we even give them that moniker? To crown a Wall Street tycoon or Silicon Valley technocrat an emperor might imbue them with power they don’t otherwise have. An exercise in rhetoric, maybe—but then again, how we define something influences how we see it, and, in turn, how we behave toward it.

In this special issue of Guernica, the third of four made possible through your generous support of our Kickstarter campaign, we offer a few panels from this sprawling imperial mosaic—its victims and beneficiaries, the merciful and the mercenary. You won’t find these empires on a map, tucked as they are behind the names of can’t-say-I’ve-been-there towns. Be on the lookout instead for an office complex, someplace awash in the soothing hum of data centers and microwave transmitters. Their borders are the perimeter of the boardroom table, the cut of a sharp suit. If, that is, you decide they exist at all.

In this issue: features from Richard Price, Laura Gottesdiener, Christopher Leonard, Jessica Machado, Ed Winstead, and the Guernica staff; interviews with Shannon Brownlee and Dr. Vikas Saini, Ben Wizner, and Anthony Pinn; an interview with artist Ben Davis; new fiction from Karen E. Bender and Constance Squires; and poetry from Danniel Schoonebeek and Rachel Richardson. We hope you enjoy the read.

American Empires: Power and Its Discontents - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics

Did you miss our latest special issue? Brighten up this gray Monday with a few choice reads on American Empire.

Oct 13, 2014 / 37,474 notes
red-lipstick:

Frida Kahlo (1907-1954, Coyoacán, Mexico) - What The Water Gave Me, 1938     Paintings: Oil on Canvas
Oct 13, 2014 / 8,717 notes

red-lipstick:

Frida Kahlo (1907-1954, Coyoacán, Mexico) - What The Water Gave Me, 1938     Paintings: Oil on Canvas

Oct 13, 2014 / 677 notes
Oct 13, 2014 / 4,484 notes

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Oct 13, 2014 / 1,548 notes

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afrikan-mapambano:

Excellent editorial cartoon
Oct 13, 2014 / 17,312 notes

afrikan-mapambano:

Excellent editorial cartoon

(via rosalindrobertson)

To feel anything deranges you. To be seen feeling anything strips you naked.
Anne Carson, from Red Doc (via violentwavesofemotion)
Oct 13, 2014 / 9,726 notes
One must learn to look away from oneself in order to see much. But the lover of knowledge who is obtrusive with his eyes—how could he see more of all things than their foregrounds? But you wanted to see the ground and background of all things; hence you must climb over yourself—upward, up until even your stars are under you!
Friedrich Nietzsche, from Thus Spoke Zarathustra (via violentwavesofemotion)
Oct 12, 2014 / 251 notes